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Deepening the Human-Animal Bond Through Music

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The American Veterinary Medical Association describes the human-animal bond as
“A mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship between people and animals that is influenced by behaviors that are essential to the health and well-being of both. This includes, but is not limited to, emotional, psychological, and physical interactions of people, animals, and the environment.”

music for dogs

Sanchez and Gina lay by the piano every time I practice my concert repertoire. And, other times, I play music especially designed for dogs for them. There have been some very tender times involving music. But, a shared music experience with Gina in 2013 was one of the most connecting moments of my life. I experienced the human-animal bond at a profound and deep level. Time stood still as we listened to music together.

Saw Grass

I was with Gina in the compassion room of an ER veterinary clinic. Her lungs were quickly filling with fluid after eating a very thick saw blade grass. Yikes, the very sharp grass blade was over 9 inches!

There was a chance she wouldn’t survive the procedure. The vet suggested I prepare to say good-bye to her, just in case she didn’t make it.

I told the full story at my recent Canine Classical Concert. Click Gina’s picture to watch the short 90 second video. Find out what happened and hear the music that inspired us to deepen our connection.

It was such an emotional experience that it became the inspiration for Music for the Human-Animal Bond. The music creates well-being for all while supporting an emotional connection between people and their beloved dogs.

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Has music ever deepened the human-animal bond for you and your dog? Thanks for sharing your experiences in a comment below.

Main Photo Credit: Viviana Guzman

 

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Music to Inspire Human Creativity

“Lilacs” painted by Trudy Spector, while she listened to Music for the Canine Household

I am a sound sensitive human. When I walk into a restaurant, if the sonic environment is too loud, I often leave or ask to be seated in a quiet area. Just like a dog, I can easily go into sensory overload and shut down when I am in an environment with sound sources coming from multiple areas. You won’t find me in crowded department stores or loud parties very often. Unlike a dog, I get to choose what sound environments are acceptable to me. I am well aware of how my physical and emotional response is affected by sound and when I have the choice, I just don’t enter sound environments that compromise my nervous system.

My home is an artist’s sanctuary, and the only outdoor sounds I generally hear are from wildlife. So I’m careful that the sounds I bring indoors add to a harmonious life. I wear ear plugs when I work out, while my fellow fitness classmates ask that the music be turned up. I play Music to Calm your Canine Companion for me and my dogs. It’s always playing at bedtime for me, even after Sanchez and Gina are asleep. If I’ve been out in an area with a lot of sensory stimulation for long periods, I’ll often play the simplified music when I come home. Or sometimes I choose total silence.

Lisa writing a blog with Sanchez However, when I want to inspire creativity, I listen to Music for the Canine Household. The recording includes piano, cello, english horn and oboe and the high frequency instruments keep me awake, while slowing tempos still keep Sanchez and Gina calm. In fact, I write most of my blogs while listening to Canine Household. Many artists, including my mother, paint to it. Her painting, pictured above, was created while the sounds of Canine Household played in the background, even though she doesn’t have a dog. Household cleaning feels effortless while listening to it and just sitting and having a cup of tea while listening is like taking a sonic, luxurious bath.

Music for the Canine Household… 33% off until April 20!!!

Between April 18-20, we’re offering Music for the Canine Household for only $9.99. That’s 33% off! Simply enter the code “HouseholdCalm” at check out and $4.94 will be deducted from your total bill. Click for full details.

Do you have music that inspires your creativity? Thanks for sharing your experiences in a comment below.

 Delivering Calm, four paws at a time…

Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from our Calm your Canine Companion music series  when you sign up for our newsletter and/or Lisa’s Blog. Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy!


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Do NOT Play This at Home For Your Dogs

While I record music specially designed to calm dogs, Sanchez and Gina experience the full range of my concert repertoire. In addition to the slowed down, simplified classical arrangements on the Through a Dog’s Ear recordings, I am often practicing music that is loud, fast, and lively.

Keep in mind that I am the person at the piano, so being near the piano for them also means being near me. Sanchez originally taught Gina to go to her bed when I sit down to play the piano. Well, Sanchez isn’t exactly in his bed during the video, but he’s sitting near my side at the piano, looking like he’s either ready to turn the pages (if there were any to turn), is preparing for a nap under the piano, or he’s giving a stress signal.

What does Sanchez think about the introduction to Chopin’s Revolutionary Etude? Click to watch and let us know what you think his reaction says in a comment below.

 Delivering Calm, four paws at a time…

Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from our Calm your Canine Companion music series  when you sign up for our newsletter and/or Lisa’s Blog. Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy!

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Nightly Rituals with Dogs

Truth be told, I am a late night owl and Sanchez and Gina aren’t. They usually go to sleep hours before me. By the time I retire, I listen to Through a Dog’s Ear music to help me fall asleep, not them.

However, our nightly ritual involves me playing the piano last thing every night, just before I go up to bed. While they have a choice of several dog beds, they always choose to sleep on their beds under the piano when I am playing music from the Through a Dog’s Ear 7-CD series.

I hope you enjoy a segment of our nightly ritual. The music is one of my personal favorites from our Calm your Canine series, Schumann’s “Kind im Einschlummern” from Kinderscenen (Scenes from Childhood). While the German really translates to “Child Falling Asleep”, I’d like to title it “Hunde im Einschlummern” or “Dogs Falling Asleep”.

Do you have a nightly ritual with your dogs? If you haven’t slumbered off into all zzzzzzzz’s watching the video, thanks for sharing your ritual in a comment below.

Delivering Calm, four paws at a time…

Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from our Calm your Canine Companion music series  when you sign up for our newsletter and/or Lisa’s Blog. Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy!

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The Story Behind Through a Dog’s Ear

Have you ever noticed that the best conversations happen around the kitchen table? Joshua Leeds and I were recently sitting at my kitchen table having lunch. We started reminiscing about how our meeting nearly 10 years ago inspired us to create Through a Dog’s Ear, music clinically demonstrated to calm the canine nervous system. We decided to turn on the video camera and make the conversation public. Sanchez and Gina get in on the action and, of course, steal the show!

Have your dogs taught you any life lessons? Thanks for sharing them in a comment below.

     Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from the Through a Dog’s Ear

Calm your Canine Companion Music Series

Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy!

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Concerts for Dogs? Seriously?

Has my performing life gone to the dogs? You bet! I’m loving it, and dogs are barking for more! Combining my love of dogs with my music talent inspired the creation of Through a Dog’s Ear, music clinically demonstrated to calm the canine nervous system. Now, I’m combining my love of performing to a cross-species audience.

As a concert pianist with a music degree from Juilliard, why am I playing concerts for people and their dogs when I could be filling concert halls with more traditional classical music? Because I REALLY love dogs! And I have chosen to dedicate my career to improving their lives by creating music that improves the quality of their life and provides them with sound therapy for improved health and behavior.

We love our dogs. We bring them into our human world and we expect them to adjust. But the truth is the human world can be very confusing for dogs. And our human soundscape is filled with chaotic sounds that they can’t orient. They are always on alert, wondering if any new sound is safe or not. Part of Through a Dog’s Ear mission is to provide dogs and their people with beautiful psychoacoustically-designed music that creates a healthy sound environment for dogs and their people. The concerts do that, and also offers a bonding experience between the two- and four-leggeds.

It’s an opportunity to share a deeply satisfying musical experience with your dog! Has your dog ever heard Chopin performed live? Have you and your dog ever listened to Bach together in a concert setting?

If you reside in the San Francisco Bay Area, I hope you can make it to one of my upcoming Canine Classical Concerts on October 6th and 7th. And you can meet my own dogs, Sanchez and Gina. As you can see from the photo above, Sanchez is practicing to be the page turner.

Have you ever bonded with your dog by sharing music together? Thanks for sharing your experiences in a comment below.

Have you tried Sound Therapy for your dogs? Through a Dog’s Ear is the only music clinically demonstrated to calm the canine nervous system.

     Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from the Through a Dog’s Ear

Calm your Canine Companion Music Series

Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy!

 

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The Dog Who Ate Santa

Caught in the Act

Gina is really a good dog. I’m sure she didn’t purposely eat Santa. She just started chewing on him, and all of his padding must have just been too tempting. I love it that Gina goes nuts over tug toys. While it may appear that she is the villain in this crime, I take full responsibility. Santa was meant to be a tug toy, and I accidentally left him out for her to claim and do with as she must. It really should have been in the toy bin with her other tug toys.

Sorry Santa

I often need to explain to dog sitters why tug toys are not supposed to be out all the time for her to play with anytime she wants. I prefer that her toys are interactive and require me to be at the other end of them. I would never buy a machine that automatically throws the ball to her, as I want her to know that I’m the one producing the fun. It not only helps build our relationship, but I wouldn’t want to miss out on all the fun either. When she visits other dogs and toys are everywhere, she actually gets way too over-stimulated and acts like a non-stop nervous bundle of energy. In addition to Through a Dog’s Ear calming her nervous system, picking up the toys also helps.

The Evidence

While she actually may be guilty for eating Santa, I confess to co-conspiracy, at least by default. Next time, I’ll leave the Santa tug in the toy bin and get a Michael Vick tug to leave out for her to destroy.

The good news is that all should be calm in the North Pole today. Recently, as part of our “Music in Shelters” program, I sent copies of the Calm your Canine Companion CD’s to the Loving Companions Animal Rescue in North Pole, Alaska.  Since it’s clinically demonstrated to calm both the canine and human nervous system, I hope Mrs. Claus and the North Pole residents are comforted today. I hope they can forgive Gina, especially since she waited calmly while I packaged up 45 CD’s to send to shelters last week. Winners of our annual TaDE Word Game chose their favorite rescues and shelters to receive free Through a Dog’s Ear music, and I played Santa and sent them. It was just my personal way of bringing Santa back to life.

Have you tried Sound Therapy for your dogs? Through a Dog’s Ear is the first music clinically demonstrated to calm the canine nervous system.

Receive a FREE DOWNLOAD from the Through a Dog’s Ear

Calm your Canine Companion Music Series

Simply click here, enter your email address and a link to the free download will be delivered to your inbox for you and your canine household to enjoy.